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They create a smart band-aid that shows the time left to heal a wound

SmartHEAL. (photo: Warsaw University of Technology)

The smartHEAL project, devised by Thomas Raczynski, Dominik Baraniecki Y Peter Walter, students from the Warsaw University of Technology (Poland), shows a cure with technology that shows the time it takes for a wound to heal.

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It is an intelligent sensor intended for dressings that detects the degree of healing of a wound by measuring its pH level and using radio frequency identification (RFID) communication systems.

This smart bandage can detect infections and collect data that healthcare professionals can analyze to determine the appropriate treatment.

SmartHEAL. (photo: Warsaw University of Technology)
SmartHEAL. (photo: Warsaw University of Technology)
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Chronic wounds affect the quality of life for nearly 2.5% of the US population, so the idea of ​​making it easier to diagnose healing was born, because it’s hard to see the condition of a wound. wound covered by a bandage. The most common mistake to fix it is to change the bandage frequently, as the creators of smartHEAL explain.

This intelligent sensor does not allow the evaluation of the wound based on its color, odor and temperature, as well as biochemical laboratory tests, which are usually expensive. In this way, you can control the tissue inflammation and avoid necrosis or even serious diseases.

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Now the team plans to complete testing and begin clinical trials. Once the certification process is complete, these dressings can be distributed and sold in 2025.

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Other scientific projects

Polyformerdeveloped by students of the McMaster University (Canada), is a machine that turns plastic bottles into filament for 3D printers.

Its mechanism is based on cutting bottles of this material into long strips, which are then introduced into an extruder. The strips that pass through the nozzle are turned into 1.75mm filament, which in turn passes through vents to cool the plastic and ends up in a spool designed for use in 3D printers.

The project facilitates the use of 3D printers in developing countries, which are often unaffordable due to the high cost of importing the filament for these printers. In this way, access to cheap and high-quality filament is guaranteed.

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Polyformer. (photo: McMaster University)
Polyformer. (photo: McMaster University)

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Finally, it is known ivydeveloped by charlotte blanckestudent of the University of Antwerp (Belgium) consisting of a portable intravenous drip replacement designed to improve patient comfort and mobility during use.

Infusion therapy replaces the current drip line with an easy-to-use infusion pump and integrated software that allows nurses monitor patients so remote.

The user interface of this infusion pump is intuitive, so clinicians can easily set up remote therapy and patients can monitor their therapy thanks to an LED strip, display, and audio notifications.

Charlotte Blancke with her Ivvy project. (photo: De Tijd)
Charlotte Blancke with her Ivvy project. (photo: De Tijd)

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