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The robots controlled with virtual reality that would be doctors in war

They develop a system that will allow soldiers to be assisted with a remote device so as not to suffer more casualties.

A robot in war is almost always seen as a weapon of a superior power to win the confrontation, but there is a project that seeks an objective more focused on health, by developing technology that is capable of helping soldiers wounded in combat. without putting the lives of others at risk.

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This plan is developed by researchers at the University of Sheffield and your name is MediTelthrough a process they call ‘telepresence’ with which he could control a robot that enters the battlefield and helps the wounded in different ways.

“The project aims to help defense and security medical personnel triage and treat victims remotely. MediTel will reduce risk to medical personnel by limiting their exposure to potential hazards while providing a better chance of survival for the victim,” he said. Sanja Dogramadzico-director of the project from the Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering at the University of Sheffield.

robots for war

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What the developers of the proposal want is to put in the hands of doctors and nurses a tool that allows them to be in the place of the conflict without having to risk their lives.

This would be achieved by means of a robot, remotely controlled by virtual reality, that reaches the place where the wounded are and takes photos and videos of the patients so that when a soldier is transferred, it is much more direct to attend to him, having collected information previous.

They develop a system that will allow soldiers to be assisted with a remote device so as not to suffer more casualties.
They develop a system that will allow soldiers to be assisted with a remote device so as not to suffer more casualties.
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But also, the robot will be able to take the vital signs of the person, heal wounds, draw blood, make oral swabs with ease, temperature, blood pressure, among other options.

This would greatly help the doctors, who put their lives at risk by entering the conflict zone, but also risk contagious diseases, contamination or losing vital resources along the way.

“Developing a remotely operated robotic system would significantly improve security by reducing the amount of danger military personnel are exposed to on the front lines,” he said. Dogramadzi.

This development is at an early stage for now, so it is not known when it could be seen in real operation, although the project is financed by government entities for the defense of the United Kingdom.

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They develop a system that will allow soldiers to be assisted with a remote device so as not to suffer more casualties.
They develop a system that will allow soldiers to be assisted with a remote device so as not to suffer more casualties.

NASA studies taking robots to the Moon

According to Spacethe POT could be preparing for send robotic dogs on their lunar missions. So the mission of Sagebrush will not leave humanity alone.

LEAP is a robot dog concept and an acronym for Legged Exploration of the Aristarchus Plateau. The Aristarchus Plateau (translated into Spanish) is a rocky elevation on the surface of the Moon. The THIS he has studied this area and wants to study it for a long time.

ESA would use the European Large Logistics Lander (EL3) to send robotic dogs to the moon. This ship will be in charge of transferring cargo and experiments to the lunar surface, and its first mission is expected to take place at the end of this decade. Naturally, LEAP would take it to the Moon, where it would be tasked with exploring the area.

“With the rover, we can investigate key features to study the geological history and evolution of the Moon, such as ejecta around craters, recent impact sites, and collapsed lava tubes, where the material may not have been altered by space weathering and other processes”, mentions patrick bambachan engineer at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Germany.

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