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Millennials are the new old men on the internet

Social networks have another rhythm that changes the roles of those who were young.

People get old but the internet doesn’t. Who 20 years ago were the young people who dominated the trends of web platforms, today are the adults who stay out of the rhythm of social networks and so Wired highlighted in an article.

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When the internet started, millennials were the first young users to find a place to meet friends outside of their home environment. But they grew up and now they are the target of ridicule for having to adapt or not understand what minors consume.

At the same time, Helena Fitzgerald, author of the article, draws attention to the constant questioning that social networks exercise about old age and the opinion of the youngest about what is and is not in trend. Which for her becomes an opportunity to tell stories.

grow old online

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“When it first came online, the Internet looked as much like the future as science fiction. The first social networks were dirty and chaotic and had nothing to do with family. It was a sleepover after someone’s parents had gone to bed. The Internet was the opposite of the world of our parents. By definition, it was not for older people, ”he begins counted.

But time was changing and those who were the owners of that novelty, those young people, became the adults, the parents and the target of memes due to the fact of getting older and not being in the same dynamics. All those who are now 30 years old or older. The millennials.

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“My awkward online generation is still here, trying to operate by the rules we created in our teens or earlier,” Fitzgerald notes.

This can be an opportunity to have formats and content that are closer to your style, so as not to be targeted by young people
This can be an opportunity to have formats and content that are closer to your style, so as not to be targeted by young people

This is also because social networks took shape with this public in the early 2000s, setting the parameters for what exists today, although with the difference that back then anonymity reigned on the web and it was not known how old was someone. Something that today is almost impossible.

“Millennials are getting older, and the whole world is going to have to hear it. Until recently, she felt like she knew where the lines were and who was on which team. She felt that she knew who was old in the network and who was young, who was the butt of the jokes and who was doing them. But in recent years, those categories have changed.”

But this is just one chance

Fitzgerald points out that all this highlights a strong situation on the internet and on social networks: aging is a problem and they want to show it that way all the time. According to her, the saturation of content and the constant idea of ​​looking at oneself is the focus of the web today, which draws the abyss between young people and those who are not so young anymore.

“Youth has always been sold as an aspirational product, and it’s nothing new for people to be afraid of getting old after the age of 25. But online social spaces run on envy; we’ve been told to feel bad about getting old forever, but where before we might have seen a billboard about it, now that billboard is an IV connected to our arms,” she writes.

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Social networks have another rhythm that changes the roles of those who were young.
Social networks have another rhythm that changes the roles of those who were young.

However, for her this represents an opportunity because people can remain the target of jokes on social networks or simply stop leaving, but also take a step forward and fill in that empty space by telling what the transition from being children is like. to old. A mystery that in youth no one is told.

After being the first generation with social networks, there are many topics to tell with “a coming of age story, so strange and fascinating, heroic and uncomfortable, exciting and terrifying.”

Because she believes that leaving is not the solution, since “social networks are so integrated into our lives that they are inescapable, both professionally and socially”, but above all to make the “strange, codependent and obsessive relationship of millennials with Internet” must be reorganized, be “the opportunity to invent a new, and perhaps better, way of living in these spaces where we have stayed so long that we are no longer young in them”.

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