Home Entertainment Kanye West: Cool rapper and producer, egomaniac, provocateur and everything else too

Kanye West: Cool rapper and producer, egomaniac, provocateur and everything else too

Kanye West: Cool rapper and producer, egomaniac, provocateur and everything else too

“Don’t put a camera in front of me if you don’t want me to say what I feel,” he says kanye-west in some of his already countless massive public appearances, events that, in addition to his hyper-audience in the present –award ceremonies, variety shows, the most famous reality show in the world–, generate reproducible material ad infinitum. But in Jeen-Yuhs: A Kanye West Trilogy, the almost five-hour portrait available on Netflix since February, his most emblematic extra-musical moments –”A Bush he doesn’t care about blacks”, “Taylor, I’m going to let you finish”, “I’m going to be a candidate for president” – are mere filler: the documentary is made up of hours and hours of filming that most of the world that claims to know kanye-west I didn’t know they existed.

The premiere coincides with other newsworthy events in his artistic-personal life: his new album, donda 2and family separation, which for a year has been generating content worthy of protagonists like him and kim kardashian. In the middle of postcards like romance for photographers with the actress Julie Fox, the protest against the use of TikTok by the eight-year-old daughter, the jealousy of Kim’s new boyfriend, this film that shows her beginnings like never before, her struggle, her bond with her mother, is not a typical behind-the-scenes . In this case, the public figure has reached such an exorbitant level –with the presidential candidacy, the reconversion to Christianity, the diagnosis of bipolarity– and the documentary returns so much to page zero, that a strange synchrony is produced by which kanye-west he is today the most talked about icon of global pop culture, and once again that simple producer with a performer’s vision who, before fulfilling his goal, got someone’s attention with a camera.

There is a certain solemnity in Jeen-Yuhs (pronunciation of “genius”), in not being entertainment in itself like other star documentaries, firstly because of its length –three hour and a half chapters–, but especially because of the depth of the material, which began to be generated towards the end of the 90s and, with bumps, it goes until 2020. Clarence “Coodie” Simmonsa comedian with a passion for filmmaking, had created the TV show ChannelZero to portray the Chicago hip-hop scene, and in the search for interviews he was dazzled by this creator of rhythms who, on the one hand, was transforming the sound of the genre with his handling of soul and r&b – he was signed Jay Z, of all the possible rappers–, but he seemed to have as much to say on a verbal and visual level. His determination to compete with the big MCs -and to be “the best dressed rapper in the world”-, his willingness to work and effective displays of talent made him trust Simmons that he had a genius ahead of him to discover and that it was worth leaving stand-up to start following him with the camera: “To see how far his dreams would go”.